So It Began by Owen Mullen

So It Began by Owen Mullen

I had previously enjoyed Owen Mullen’s Glasgow-based series featuring PI Charlie Cameron so I was intrigued to try So It Began, which is a crime thriller set in New Orleans introducing us to PI Vincent Delaney. The location may be very different, but the writing and storytelling are excellent as always and I have now added New Orleans to the list of places I’d like to visit in America.

It is seven years since Delaney worked as a police officer, but when he is asked to help NOPD and the FBI with a joint investigation into a serial killer targeting children performing at pageants all across the country he cannot refuse. At the same time, he is investigating the extortion of shopkeepers in the North Le Moyne area of the city by corrupt police officers, and is looking over his shoulder for an escaped criminal, Julian Boutte, seeking revenge for the death of his brother.

I don’t particularly enjoy reading about the murders of children, but here the main focus was on catching the killer, rather than dwelling on the crimes themselves, and thankfully it was all handled with great sensitivity. The separate plot threads are woven together and brought to a conclusion in such a way as to suggest this may be the beginning of a series; I certainly hope so.  

The story is told mostly through Delaney’s character, and his droll inner monologue lightens the darkness of the story. He is likeable and believable, with a cast of well-drawn supporting characters especially his music-loving dog, Lowell, who steals the show. There are also chapters giving us more detail about the children taking part in the pageants, and their families, so that we see them as real people and not just statistics. So It Began is a tense and gripping thriller with a great setting, that will keep you up late into the night as you just have to read one more chapter.

Thanks to Bloodhound Books and NetGalley for providing me with a digital copy to review.

     

Dark is the Grave by TG Reid

Dark is the Grave by TG Reid

Dark is the Grave is the first book in a gripping new Scottish crime series featuring DCI Duncan Bone. Still on sick leave after having been seriously injured in an explosion that killed the Peek-a-Boo killer, DCI Bone receives a gruesome film of another killing, and has no choice but to return to active duty, even though he may not be quite ready. This has to be the work of a copycat killer, but the clock is ticking and DCI Bone and his team must stop them before any more police officers die.

The action is set in the area around the Campsie Fells just north of Glasgow which makes an unusual and interesting setting for a crime novel; I grew up not too far away and really enjoyed revisiting the area. It made a pleasant change from big-city settings and reminded me of JD Kirk’s crime novels in this respect.   

The characterisation is convincing with each member of the team quite clearly defined, and humorous dialogue often used to offset the grimly dark storyline. DCI Bone is a flawed and troubled character, but this does not stop him being an excellent detective. The pace is fairly relentless as the killer could strike again at any time. The author makes it difficult for us to determine who the killer is by introducing several red herrings, but this is only to be expected. As usual, I was almost at the end of the book before I worked it out. I read a lot of crime fiction and was very impressed with Dark is the Grave; I have already pre-ordered the next one in the series – Blood Water Falls – and look forward to reading it later in the year. Thanks to TG Reid for a digital copy that I review as a member of Rosie’s Book Review Team #RBRT

Kimura: A Tale of a Japanese Murderess by RG Honda

Kimura by RG Honda

 I chose to read Kimura: A Tale of a Japanese Murderess because of the setting as I am fascinated by Japanese culture, and this did not disappoint.

The novel opens with Naoko realising that she has killed her husband; he is lying in a pool of blood at the bottom of the stairs, but was it an accident? She makes her escape and goes off to meet her friend Akari at a festival. There are hints that Naoko has a problem controlling her violent temper, both with her husband and with her sister, Yuki, who disappeared seven years previously. They now have a lead on her whereabouts and plan to rescue her. With the police chasing Naoko, they are forced to go on the run, but will they get to Yuki before it is too late?

This novel reads as though it was translated from the Japanese as some of the expressions are strangely stilted and awkward – I could find no information as to whether this was the case or not – but this did not hinder my understanding and perhaps added something to the narrative. There are graphic scenes of violence and torture, so bear that in mind before you begin reading as it is not for the faint-hearted.

The characters are well drawn and believable, except perhaps for Yuki who is almost a caricature, and I really liked Takamoto, the old man who lived on the boat. I loved the road trip section of the plot, and could imagine this book being made into a dark atmospheric film. The setting comes across as completely authentic, but the underlying theme of the human trafficking and slavery was deeply upsetting.

I was unable to find out anything about this author, so have no idea if they have written anything else, but would like to thank them for the digital copy that I chose to review as a member of Rosie’s Book Review Team #RBRT

Annie Stanley, All At Sea by Sue Teddern

Annie Stanley All at Sea by Sue Teddern

Annie Stanley is taking time out; she has given up her teaching job, split up with her boyfriend and is spending a lot of time on her sofa. When her father dies suddenly she is, as the title suggests, ‘all at sea’.  When she finds out that her father’s partner, Bev, plans to scatter his ashes somewhere that has no significance for her or her sister, Kate, she acts on impulse and steals the urn.  She embarks on what becomes a road trip around the coast visiting all the areas mentioned in the shipping forecast. Despite living in landlocked St Albans, her father had been an avid listener to what he called ‘the soundtrack to our lives’ and ‘the poetry of our Isles’ and had even named the cat, Cromarty.

Annie is grieving and needs to find a way to say goodbye that means something to her, which I can totally relate to. What starts as an ill-thought-out impulse, becomes a plan to visit all the coastal areas mentioned in the shipping forecast. As she travels from Cromarty to Forth, Tyne, Dogger and beyond, Annie re-evaluates her life, past and present, and gradually makes peace with herself, and comes to appreciate that, even if just for a short while, Bev was an important part of her father’s life.

The characters are well drawn and believable, a road-trip theme always appeals to me, and each chapter is aptly prefaced with a phrase from the shipping forecast. I had to look up the shipping forecast online to find out where some of the areas were and discovered some beautifully illustrated maps which are well worth a look. I really enjoyed this book, it made me laugh despite the sadness and grief, and look forward to reading whatever Sue Teddern writes next. Thanks to Pan Macmillan, Mantle and NetGalley for a digital copy to review.

Out of the Silence by Owen Mullen

Out of the Silence by Owen Mullen

In a village in the Punjab region of Pakistan, Afra and Jameel want to marry and spend the rest of their lives together, but her mother does not agree. After being refused permission to marry Afra, Jameel leaves his village and sets off to find his only relative in Lahore. He is welcomed by his uncle and goes on to become a successful business man, but he never forgets Afra. Meanwhile, Afra is sold to a wealthy family in Lahore to become the wife of the oldest son. They are horrible to her right from the start, but when she does not give him an heir, she is reduced to the role of household slave and treated appallingly. Years later, members of this prominent family are being killed off, one by one.

Owen Mullen skillfully  weaves the strands of the story together, leading us up many false paths until we learn who is behind the killings. I did guess eventually, but only at the very last minute. The writing is evocative, full of rich descriptions of the sights, sounds and smells, and brings this area of Pakistan to life. I have never been to this part of the world, but had no trouble imagining the setting in vivid colour.

This story left a lasting impression on me; long after I had finished reading I was still thinking about what Afra (and others like her) had suffered during her short life. This is a misogynistic society where animals are treated better than women. Out of the Silence is a shocking exposé of the abuse suffered by women at the hands of their husbands, brothers, cousins, and men in general. While it is extremely upsetting to read, it has been written with compassion and understanding. It is also a gripping murder mystery. The characters are well written and believable; some you will hate with a vengeance, and others will go straight to your heart.

I chose Out of the Silence without reading the blurb as I had enjoyed other books by Owen Mullen (crime thrillers set in Glasgow) and, though it is very different, I highly recommend it, and suggest you try some of his other books too – you won’t be disappointed.

Thanks to Bloodhound Books and NetGalley for a digital copy to review.